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Life Sciences

Study: How cells form 'trash bags' for recycling waste

If these "trash bags" are unable to make their deliveries, numerous diseases including cancer and neurodegenerative diseases emerge. Furthermore, viruses like HIV can hijack these membrane-sculpting proteins to burst out of infected cells.

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Message from the Associate Vice Provost for Research

 

In the past decade, a campus-wide recruitment effort brought a new generation of life scientists to Cornell. These new recruits are using recently discovered technologies to answer fundamental questions about organisms and their response to environmental challenges.

—Andrew H. Bass, Associate Vice Provost for Research, Cornell University

 

 

Our Vision

At Cornell, a collaborative culture encourages life scientists to connect across the disciplines—computer science, physics, engineering, biology, and chemistry—to research, discover, and share their solutions with the world.

Our Progress

In the past decade, the life sciences at Cornell have flourished. With 77 new faculty members, three new facilities—Duffield Hall, the Physical Sciences building, and Weill Hall—life scientists continue to define the future of interdisciplinary research at Cornell.

On and between the university’s campuses, these scientists’ collaborative efforts demonstrate Cornell’s growing involvement in global environmental and health challenges. They have:

  • Created new technologies for non-invasive imaging of biological events associated with tissue injury and repair
  • Designed computationally intensive analytical methods to interpret an ever-expanding genomic library
  • Found new approaches in geriatric psychiatry and medicine to help an aging human population
  • Discovered nutritional supplements and biofuels that will propel the world into the future, and more

During a burgeoning era for the life sciences, we seek to continue the momentum we have gained in generating discoveries and applications as a result of leveraging tremendous breadth and depth across our university.

Our Priorities

The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, the College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Engineering, the College of Human Ecology, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, and the College of Veterinary Medicine aim to raise more than $30 million by 2015. Across the units, support for the life sciences will benefit faculty renewal and recruitment, research, graduate fellowships, and facilities—ensuring the continued strength of the life sciences at Cornell.
 

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News

Pica -- craving and intentionally consuming nonfood substances, such as earth -- and amylophagy, eating raw starches -- …
Robin Davisson, professor of molecular physiology, was recently awarded the 2012 Arthur C. Corcoran Memorial Award and …
Cornell's agricultural experiment stations and cooperative extension will allocate annual federal grants to land-grant …
Daniel Decker, Cornell professor of natural resources, has received the highest national award in wildlife sciences from …
Cornell is playing a major role in a research and education project that seeks to develop perennial feedstock production …
As part of the Art of Horticulture course, three student designers modeled their own creations at a fashion show, with …
A five-year study of plant populations provides rare real-time data that demonstrate key predictions by Charles Darwin on …
Plants and animals are far more dependent -- and interdependent -- on their trillions of microbial partners than …
Using bacteria that can produce an electric current, student engineers are putting the finishing touches on a low-cost, …
A tiny, single-celled organism is having a big effect on elementary, middle and high school science teachers across the …
The science of how and why plant roots get their shape, it turns out, is a twisted tale.
Thanks to a Hunter R. Rawlings III Cornell Presidential Research Scholarship, Ben Wie '13 spent the past summer …
Scott Emr has been reappointed to a five-year term as director of the Weill Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology.
A Shoals Marine Lab researcher believes that commercial harvest of rockweed, a brown seaweed found in intertidal zones, …
Proteins embedded in the lipid membranes of cells feel long-range attractive forces in specific patterns that mediate the …
When living cells activate a gene, they have a system in reserve to turn it off.
The National Academy of Sciences today announced the election of 84 new members and 21 foreign associates from 15 …
Presented by the American Chemical Society (ACS), the award honors and encourages excellence in organic chemistry.
Dean Alan Mathios speaks about the exciting university-wide research opportunities provided by the MRI scanner just …
The microbial community found in the gut creates beneficial health conditions for pregnant women, and these same …
Like quality-control managers in factories, bacteria possess built-in machinery that track the shape and quality of …
Susan Henry, professor of molecular biology and genetics and the former Ronald P. Lynch Dean of the College of Agriculture …
To honor his parents, Rajiv L. Gupta, M.S. '69, has established the Phool Prakash and Rukmini Sahai Graduate Fellowship …
A new method for looking at how proteins fold inside mammal cells could one day lead to better flu vaccines, among other …
The famous biologist Stephen J. Gould once asked: If we rerun the tape of life, would the outcome of evolution be the same?
From the microcosmos to the cosmos, a Cornell researcher's hobbies allow him to understand different worlds.
Geoffrey Coates, Cornell's Tisch University Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, won the DSM Performance Materials …
How true -- those perfect, red tomatoes from the store just can't match ones plucked from the garden.
The future of prostate cancer therapy may lie in a tiny, "sticky" silicon chip dubbed GEDI (Geometrically Enhanced …
New research shows that a more relevant sensory apparatus may help some insects hunt for a flower's sweet juice: …
Males of all species have been known to go to extremes to woo a female, but few have gone so far as the male club-winged …
A receptor recently discovered to control the movement of immune cells across central nervous system barriers may hold the …
Cornell biomedical scientists have discovered that stem cells, in contact with even trace amounts of cancer cells, can …
Maize was likely domesticated in Mexico around 10,000 years ago, and since then humans have continued to radically alter …
For the first time, the genome of the tomato, Solanum lycopersicum, has been decoded, an important step toward improving …
The results could lead to new techniques in regenerative medicine and better drug delivery strategies.
For the first time, scientists have identified how a plant's skin is assembled.
As the Earth's human population has skyrocketed since the rise of agriculture some 10,000 years ago -- to 7 billion people …
For years, researchers have known that obesity, type 2 diabetes and low-level inflammation are linked, but how they are …
Clark's research focuses on the genetic basis of adaptive variation in natural populations, with emphasis on quantitative …

Contacts

Andrew H. Bass
Associate Vice Provost for Research
Cornell University
W239 Seeley G. Mudd Hall
Ithaca, NY 14853
ahb3@cornell.edu
607-254-4372 

 

Jon Denison
Associate Vice President for Colleges & Units
Alumni Affairs & Development
jdd93@cornell.edu
607-254-7497